Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: A Post-WWII Tragedy: The Challenge To Find Good Yiddish Editors and Translators

What happens to a literature without good editors and translators? Rivka Augenfeld, Montreal-based Yiddish activist, discusses what she calls “one of the tragedies of the [post-WWII] period for Yiddish [culture].”

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Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: My Mother Went On A Hunger Strike to Go to School

As so many kids around the world may be dragging their feet as they go back to school this week, Emile Karafiol tells of his mother’s going on a hunger strike to be allowed to go to school.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: Warsaw Ghetto Commemoration at Camp Hemshekh

Seventy-two years ago, on July 28th, 1942, occupants of the Warsaw Jewish ghetto organized an armed resistance, eventually leading to an uprising almost a year later. Hear Moishe Rosenfeld recall how they used to commemorate the historic date at Camp Hemshekh, a socialist Yiddishist summer camp.

 

Daniel Kahn, Singer-Songwriter, On Discovering Yiddish

In honor of Yidstock 2014: The Festival of New Yiddish Music currently on at the Yiddish Book Center, singer/songwriter Daniel Kahn reflects on his discovery of and feelings about Yiddish.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “On Being Jewish and American.”

On the occasion of July 4th, United States Independence Day, Judy Kunofsky encourages others to build a modern American Jewish community that has “all the pieces.”

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “The only Jew in a college library.”

What’s a bar mitzvah? What are the High Holidays? Elaine Trehub reflects on what it was like for her to answer these and other questions as the only Jewish person working at a college library.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “Learning Yiddish to Read Sholem Aleichem.”

This weekend we will present a course on the great Yiddish writer Sholem Aleichem at the Yiddish Book Center. Learn how Nora Feinstein, a student in our Steiner Summer Yiddish Program, was inspired to learn Yiddish so that she could read Sholem Aleichem’s work in the original.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “I Grew Up with Some of the Guys in Murder, Inc.”

Arthur Klein, Brooklyn native, discusses what he knew about the Jewish Mafia known as “Murder, Inc.” from when he was young. In particular, he remembers when Abe “Kid Twist” Reles mysteriously died while being held in a hotel during a trial in the 1940s.

Protected: Emmys and Finger Sandwiches with Monty Hall

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