Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: I Remember the Great Depression

With the stocks in the news so much this week, we couldn’t help but think of this clip from Arthur Klein, z”l, about his memories of the Great Depression.

Advertisements

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: America Won’t Take That Away From Us: Growing Up With Yiddish

“What Hitler couldn’t take away from us with his hatred, America won’t take away from us with her goodness.” Elliott Palevsky reflects on why his Holocaust-survivor parents insisted on raising their children in a Yiddish-speaking household in America.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: A Stint on a Yiddish Soap Opera

Paul Berg remembers his burgeoning career as a child actor on a Yiddish soap opera and doing stand-up comedy in the Catskills – and why his parents put an end to it.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: An Appreciation for America, as a Jewish Immigrant

Lekoved (in honor of) the Fourth of July (U.S. Independence Day), Arnold Friedmann reflects on his appreciation for America as a Jewish immigrant.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: My Ancestor Fought In The American Civil War, Not on the “Right” Side

A different kind of yikhes (family legacy): Professor Marc Caplan considers his ancestor’s involvement in the American Civil War, which ended 150 years ago this spring.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “You Sing What You Know”: How Yiddish Landed Me a Spot in a Prestigious Chorus

Martin Broder tells how a Yiddish folk song came in handy at his audition for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: Negotiating Chinese, Jewish, and American Values

Lekoved (in honor of) Chinese New Year, Yiddish student Mei Li Isaacson reflects on how she’s negotiated her Chinese, Jewish, and American values.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: On the Spot, He Decided to Marry Her Six Children and All

Lekoved (in honor of) the not-so-Jewish holiday of Valentine’s Day, Debra’s favorite story of how her great-grandmother’s beauty found her an adoring husband.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: The Shvits (shvitz – sauna) at Coney Island

Where did young Jewish men of Brooklyn go to “sweat it off” and “sleep the night away” after a night on the town? The shvits (shvitz – sauna) at Coney Island, of course!

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “The Holocaust Is Not the Inevitable Outcome of the History of the Polish Jews”

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimlett, curator of the newly-opened Museum of the History of Polish Jews, discusses how the museum works to strike a balance in presenting the 1000-year history of Jews in Poland.