Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: America Won’t Take That Away From Us: Growing Up With Yiddish

“What Hitler couldn’t take away from us with his hatred, America won’t take away from us with her goodness.” Elliott Palevsky reflects on why his Holocaust-survivor parents insisted on raising their children in a Yiddish-speaking household in America.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: The First Purim After the Holocaust

Zol zayn purim! (Let it be Purim!) Leo Weitzman remembers how the yontef (holiday) was celebrated in a displaced persons’ camp for the first time after the Holocaust.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: We Would Embrace Even A Stranger: Vilna in the First Days After WWII

What were the first days like after the end of World War Two and the Holocaust? Fania Brantsovsky remembers returning to Vilna from the surrounding forests where she had been a Jewish partisan.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “The Holocaust Is Not the Inevitable Outcome of the History of the Polish Jews”

Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimlett, curator of the newly-opened Museum of the History of Polish Jews, discusses how the museum works to strike a balance in presenting the 1000-year history of Jews in Poland.

Weekly Bite of Yiddishkayt: “Yiddish-speaking shtetlekh in 1940s Tel Aviv”

I am still busy recording amazing stories from Yiddish writers and scholars here in Israel. Leading Israeli historian Israel Bartal remembers the presence of Eastern European culture and Yiddish language in his childhood in Tel Aviv, then Palestine.